Speaking

Through motivational speaking engagements, particularly for young people, I aim to uplift, inspire & entertain.

Although only 26, I use my own life experiences and lessons to motivate young people, especially those of African-Caribbean descent, encouraging them to achieve their potential and go beyond their own or others’ limited expections. My relative youth gives me the added bonus of being able to relate to the trials and tribulations of being a young person finding their way in the world.

All the way from primary and secondary school, where I was Head Girl, to Cambridge University where I was elected the Student Union’s Anti-Racism officer for 2 years in a row, I have been used to dealing with issues which confront today’s young people and taking on a leadership and motivational role.

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5 thoughts on “Speaking

  1. Saw a comment you made on Davis McQueen’s site regarding racism. I agree with you in that the world has become more individualistic so then the language used to define the struggle of the oppressed all over the world needs to change. You are right, the oppressed used to all be in the same boat. It was easy to inspire then. I’m struggling now with how to inspire folks to change when it looks like we have made real progress. I can’t deny that the world and it’s institution have become more open to the oppressed –by crook or hook. and please remember that it took revolutionary talk to make those changes. Folks see the progress and pay less attention to the problems. and there are still problems out there worth fighting en masse or as an individual. the problem is that most folks have stopped looking. we need to redefine what the individual means and what is his/her duty t life. that’s the 21st century for you.

    (By the way, a British sociologist Zygmunt Bauman has done brilliant work on the individualistic drive vs community and all the other problems of this “liquid” life. Read up on him if you haven’t already.)

    Like you, I want to embark on a speaking career. I just finished this piece last night. Fits into what you’re getting at in your piece. Click http://youtube.com/watch?v=AYfcbKJ_nHI and let me know what you think.

    Thanks
    http://youtube.com/user/bygINCpresents

  2. Saw a comment you made on David McQueen’s site regarding racism. I agree with you in that the world has become more individualistic so then the language used to define the struggle of the oppressed all over the world needs to change. You are right, the oppressed used to all be in the same boat. It was easy to inspire then. I’m struggling now with how to inspire folks to change when it looks like we have made real progress. I can’t deny that the world and it’s institution have become more open to the oppressed –by crook or hook. and please remember that it took revolutionary talk to make those changes. Folks see the progress and pay less attention to the problems. and there are still problems out there worth fighting en masse or as an individual. the problem is that most folks have stopped looking. we need to redefine what the individual means and what is his/her duty t life. that’s the 21st century for you.

    (By the way, a British sociologist Zygmunt Bauman has done brilliant work on the individualistic drive vs community and all the other problems of this “liquid” life. Read up on him if you haven’t already.)

    Like you, I want to embark on a speaking career. I just finished this piece last night. Fits into what you’re getting at in your piece. Click http://youtube.com/watch?v=AYfcbKJ_nHI and let me know what you think.

    Thanks
    http://youtube.com/user/bygINCpresents

  3. It is so refreshing to hear your comments and outlook on life. Just like you I am a young black woman (25) and I am seeking to inspire and uplift young people of colour. Having studied Sociology as an undergraduate it has made me fully aware of society and its changing patterns.

    As a young child I was always hungry for answers and knowledge. This is why I chose to study Sociology. I wondreded what made many black people underacheive, I learnt that how one is treated in their early years can have a profound effect on their later years. By this I mean the educational system and how many schools fail young black men.

    I am now on the quest to establish why so many young black men are in mental institutions. Is this in fact down to racism? Living in South London I have observed an increase in what I see as young black men having mental issues. I hope you can join me in unravelling the cause of this, but most importantly what measures can be taken to put a stop to young black men being over represented in mental health institutions.

    I, myself have often thought about becoming a motivational speaker. I too have lived life and have been through many trials and tribulations. I definitely have a story to tell. I feel that being young and experiencing many things in my life that many young woman go through I can empathize and in fact they can identify with me.

    I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

  4. Go for it! Real life expereince sharing is one of the most powerful way of reaching out to others! You know…live your life so postively that in influences others…a powerful force that cannot be resisted!

  5. I congratulate you for embarking on such a wonderful mission. I am from the home counties and i can tell you, that all of us, regardless of our indivual origins around the diaspora must think about who our children encounter in school and what they tell and teach our children.
    I had a teacher who had been brought up with tales of natives, savages and the great civilising mission of the white man’s burden. She would never take my word as honest, my desk was searched first if anything was missing , she refused to believe that my parents were married and adressed all the letters to my mother as Miss ( maiden name) and my father as Mr (my surname) and has to be told otherwise by the headteacher. she paid no attention when i was beaten up by bullies and warned me not to follow them. this could have broken a lesser child but i grew strong. We have to support the little ones and keep them happy and secure.

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